WHAT IS ADDISON DISEASE IN DOGS(CANINE HYPOADRENOCORTICISM)?

ADDISON'S DISEASE IN DOGSWHAT IS ADDISON DISEASE IN DOGS?

Addison disease in dogs is a condition in which a dog’s adrenal gland does not produce a sufficient amount of either cortisol or aldosterone. This can cause many serious health complications and has a high probability of being misdiagnosed as another disease. This is because the symptoms of Addison’s disease in dogs are relatively general, including fatigue, diarrhea, sweating, and muscle pain.

The most difficult aspect of dealing with Addison’s disease in your dog is receiving a positive diagnosis for the disease. After diagnosis, the treatment options for Addison’s disease are very effective, though will require your dog to take medication for the rest of their life.

ABOUT THE ADRENAL GLAND

The adrenal gland is made up of two distinct layers, each which are responsible for producing different types of hormones:

1-The interior layer

The interior layer of the adrenal gland (also called the medulla) is responsible for producing hormones similar to adrenaline.

2-The outer layer

The outer layer of the adrenal gland (also called the cortex) is responsible for producing corticosteroids.

The two hormones produced by the adrenal gland that are most commonly deficient in a condition of Addison’s disease are cortisol and aldosterone.

Cortisol

which is part of the glucocorticoid group of hormones, helps your dog’s body deal with stress, aids in the proper conversion of food into energy, and manages the immune system’s inflammatory response.

Aldosterone

which is part of the mineralocorticoid group of hormones, helps maintain proper blood pressure, as well as allowing the kidneys to keep a proper balance of sodium and potassium in your dog’s body.

ADDISON DISEASE IN DOGS

WHAT CAUSES ADDISON DISEASE IN DOGS?

There are several factors that can cause Addison disease in dogs, usually related to the improper function of the adrenal glands. The adrenal glands are very important for your dog’s overall health, as they produce many important hormones to aid in the proper function of your dog’s body.

WHAT DOGS ARE PRONE TO ADDISON DISEASE?

1-Breed

Certain dog breeds are suspected to be more prone to develop Addison’s disease. These breeds include

  1. Portuguese Water Dogs.
  2. Bearded Collies.
  3. Standard Poodles.
  4. Great Danes.
  5. The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier.

2-surgery near the pituitary gland

Dogs that have had surgery near the pituitary gland or hypothalamus may also develop Addison’s disease (usually Secondary Addison’s, since this would be a result of damage to the pituitary gland or hypothalamus).

3-Age

Generally, many cases of Addison’s disease are seen in young or middle-aged female dogs. However, dogs of any age or gender are able to develop Addison’s disease.

WHAT SYMPTOMS OF ADDISON DISEASE IN DOGS?

Most dogs with Addison’s disease initially have gastrointestinal disturbances like vomiting. Lethargy is also a common early sign. Poor appetite can occur as well. These are pretty vague signs and it is extremely easy to miss this disease. More severe signs occur when a dog with hypoadrenocorticism is stressed or when potassium levels get high enough to interfere with heart function. Dogs with this problem will sometimes suffer severe shock symptoms when stressed

 

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY ADDISON DISEASE IN DOGS

There are two different classifications for Addison’s disease in dogs, which depend largely on the underlying cause of the adrenal insufficiency.

1-Primary Addison disease in dogs

  • the adrenal insufficiency is directly caused by improper function or damage to the adrenal glands.
  • Primary hypoadrenocorticism affects salt/potassium balance in the body and glucocorticoids as well
  • It is not known why primary hypoadrenocorticism occurs but it may be an immune-mediated process.

2- Secondary Addison disease in dogs

  • Secondary Addison disease in dogs usually only affects the glucocorticoids.
  • The adrenal insufficiency is not because of malfunctioning adrenal glands.
  • Secondary Addison’s disease is caused by the improper transmission of the hormone ACTH from the pituitary gland or reduced production of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) by the hypothalamus.

In secondary Addison disease in dogs, the adrenal gland is still functioning normally. Secondary hypoadrenocorticism probably occurs most often when prednisone or other cortisone being administered for medical reasons are suddenly withdrawn. It can occur as a result of pituitary cancer or some other process that interferes with the production of hormones that stimulate the adrenal glands.

ADDISON’S DISEASE VS. CUSHING’S DISEASE

  • While Addison’s disease is a condition in which there is a deficiency of corticosteroid production, Cushing’s disease is the exact opposite.
  • Dogs with Cushing’s disease will have an excess of corticosteroids, usually cortisol.
  • The treatment for Cushing’s disease involves suppression of hormone production through carefully regulated use of certain treatments.
  • However, dogs undergoing treatment for Cushing’s disease may develop Addison’s disease, especially if their corticosteroid production drops dramatically from the use of the Cushing’s disease treatments.
  • This may cause Addison’s disease and will require a different treatment approach.

ADDISON DISEASE IN DOGS IS NOT ALWAYS FATAL

With proper treatment procedures, a dog with Addison’s disease can still participate in all of their normal daily activities. Even though dogs with Addison’s disease will usually require medication therapy for the rest of their lives, this is a treatable disease that does not have to affect your dog’s quality of life

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